Audio Assault (Codename: Winger 3) by Jeff Adams

Audio Assault

Theo Reese is just like any other seventeen-year-old—with one small exception.

This summer all he wants is to spend time with his boyfriend, Eddie, and work on his MIT research project. His parents have other plans.

An old friend needs the help of Theo’s family. Oliver Glenwood is an ’80s music star who runs his own label. His wife and his daughter, Sofia, now a chart topper herself, are the targets of kidnappers. Oliver hopes they can eliminate whoever is behind the threat.

When Theo uncovers an even more insidious plot, the covert agency the Reeses work for, Tactical Operational Support, swoops into action.

Song files have been modified to steal personal data from devices and emit a tone that drives listeners into a homicidal rage. Theo and his parents race against the clock to stop this mysterious enemy from releasing the music on an unsuspecting populace and causing worldwide chaos.

Just when Theo thinks the mission couldn’t be more complicated, Eddie shows up in New York looking to hang out with his boyfriend.

No one ever said being a teenage secret agent would be easy.

 

Type: Novel / 59,213 words
Format: Ebook / Paperback
Publisher: Harmony Ink Press

“I loved it. It was a great read. I had some expectations, but they were surpassed by far. It was full of action, more than the previous installments, and the twists the plot took were so unexpected and exciting that I just couldn’t put it down.” – Ana, Gay Book Reviews

From Chapter 2 (Warning: If you haven’t read Schooled yet there are spoilers here.)

Sweat dripped off me as I sprinted to the puck in a race against a hulking defenseman. These pickup games brought out all kinds, and that made them insanely fun. The only consistency, for me at least, was that Mitch and I did this together.

He’d gotten us into roller hockey, and I’d come to appreciate playing in the heat. We were in an ice league for the summer too, which was great, but the contrast of playing the game on pavement proved enjoyable.

I scooped the puck out of reach of the defensemen and crouched low to get by him in a move I wasn’t sure I’d be able to execute on ice. The traction of the pavement helped. After taking off toward the opponent’s goal, I lined up to shoot, but I saw Mitch get into a good position at the last minute. I passed to him. The goalie hadn’t expected the change up, and he left a wide-open net for Mitch to score.

We fist-bumped as we headed back to the sidelines, satisfied with our shift.

“Two minutes left!” called the timekeeper.

With so many playing today, it was unlikely we’d get another shift. At least we went out with a goal.

As we stood with our teammates, I peeled my wet T-shirt off. The roller hockey gear was light, which was good on super-hot July days like this. I grabbed one of the water bottles out of my backpack and drank.

I’d returned from Tactical Operational Support HQ yesterday afternoon just in time to have dinner with Mom and Dad. We were home together for the first time in nearly two months. Then Eddie and I went to the movies, where the latest Avengers movie played while we made out in the back corner of the theater. And this morning was about hockey.

“Jesus, Theo,” Mitch said, “I’m still getting used to the angry scar the bullet left, but now this epic bruise. What’d you do?”

“That’s from a slap shot.” Mitch couldn’t take his eyes off the dark, angry splotch that spread from my sternum across part of my right pectoral. “I got invited to a pickup game, and I was able to borrow gear, except the shoulder pads.”

That rolled right out of my mouth like it was the truth. I’d used it on Eddie last night, so I was used to saying it.

“Game!” That call rang out and the teams lined up to shake hands. Our team had lost by two and that was okay. Unlike Tigers games, this was purely about fun.

We continued to talk as we gathered our gear. “You need to be more careful. You get hurt way too much. Your parents’ll put their foot down eventually.”

I laughed as he sounded more like a parent than my friend. If only he knew what my parents actually thought. Mom and Dad were proud.

“They’re glad this is only a hockey injury.”

I pulled out another bottle of water, opened it and poured it over my head. The cool water felt wonderful. Eddie and Iris approached as I toweled off. Even though I’d seen Eddie last night, my heart sped up from the excitement of spending the afternoon with him. There’d been a big empty space in me while I was gone. I hadn’t expected to miss him so much. Despite talking and texting daily, it wasn’t enough to satisfy my need to be around him.

We planned to spend as much time as possible together this weekend.

“I don’t suppose you’ve got an extra bottle?” Mitch picked up my backpack and looked inside. “Actually, what do you have in here? It weighs a ton. How’d you even bike here with this and a stick on your back?”

I snatched the pack—I didn’t like people digging around in there because there were plenty of hidden compartments—and got the last bottle for him. “You know me. I like to be prepared. Besides, if I hadn’t brought all this water you’d be dehydrated. And I need a change of clothes.”

“If you told me you played without a shirt, I would’ve come to watch.” Eddie wrapped me in a quick hug despite the water and sweat.

“For sure,” Iris added. “How often do you get to watch hockey with a bunch of shirtless players? Are you hiding something from me, Mitch?”

Mitch gulped down water before he answered. “You didn’t miss anything. Everyone was properly clothed.”

Eddie sighed wistfully. “Suppose that’s a good thing. This one’s getting hurt enough already.” He lightly ran his fingers across the bruise, just right so it didn’t cause any pain. “Every time he goes away, I fear how he’s going to come back.”

“Right?” Mitch looked at me and Iris looked at him. “He gets a little more battered every time he leaves town.”